Upcoming

from 6 October 2016
Mobile Worlds
On the Migration of Things in Transcultural Societies

There are countless numbers of things travelling around the globe – in the form of commodities, as virtual shapes on com-puter screens, and in the luggage carried by tourists or migrants. This movement of objects, people, and ideas and the ac-companying mixing of cultures in a country like Germany, which is a destination for migrants, are the subject of the re-search project Mobile Worlds: The Migration of Things in Transcultural Societies. Together with the European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), the Goethe University Frankfurt (Main), and the Erich Kästner School in Hamburg-Farmsen, the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg (MKG) is examining the complex interweaving of lifeworlds and object worlds caused by waves of migration both past and present. In a project curated by Roger M. Buergel, the MKG is research-ing the transculturality of the objects in its collection, such as Persian pottery that imitates Chinese porcelain or a designer coat by Alexander McQueen that combines the classical uniform with a paisley pattern. In corresponding fashion, Esther Pilkington, Sophia Prinz – both from the European University in Frankfurt (Oder) – and Ulrich Schötker from the Erich-Kästner School in Hamburg-Farmsen have developed an experimental educational programme focused on schoolchildren, who can be considered experts in everyday transcultural life. In this project, groups of pupils from the Erich Kästner School not only play an active part in the museum research and are involved in creating the exhibition but also help to generate an ethnographic understanding of the order of things in their own lifeworlds. The aim of this collaboration is to create a sec-ond collection of exhibition objects that will offer commentary on the historical exhibits, underpinning or contradicting them. In another sub-project Hans Peter Hahn and Friedemann Neumann of the Goethe University in Frankfurt (Main) examine what constitutes a migrant’s day-to-day world of things, what stories and experiences are connected with them, and what values, aspirations, and the significance they convey. In 2018, at the end of the process, the individual project results will be compiled in an exhibition at the MKG. | click here for further information


Opening conference

At the beginning of the project Mobile Worlds. On the Migration of Things in Transcultural Societies, a conference on 6 and 7 October brings together voices from the university, the museum, art and institution-critical activism to take stock of the situation: what impact have the countless initiatives and projects on the epic topics "migration and museum", "transculturality", "mediation and cultural education" or "art and transdisciplinary research" had so far? Which elements of these debates and practices have proved effective and what connections can be drawn? The detailed programme can be here. | The participation at the conference is free. Registration until 4 October 2016 with: lerch-zajaczkowska(at)mobile-welten.org

 

Exhibition: "The Transcultural Classroom"

From 6 October, the exhibition, which is continuously developing, shows the result of a first viewing of the objects from MKG. In a project curated by Roger M. Buergel, the MKG is researching the transculturality of the objects in its collection, such as Persian pottery that imitates Chinese porcelain or a designer coat by Alexander McQueen that antagonises the British Empire with Indian patterns. The objects speak at least two or three languages, like many residents of the city. The exhibition also presents the first findings of the object researchers. These are schoolchildren at the Erich-Kästner-Schule in Hamburg-Farmsen, who can be considered experts in everyday transcultural life and do not only play an active part in the museum research and are involved in creating the exhibition but also help to generate an ethnographic understanding of the order of things in their own lifeworlds. The aim of this collaboration is to create a kind of counter collection that comments on, supports or thwarts the historical exhibits.

 

Ill.: Untitled, 2004, © Ines Doujak