Archive

27 January to 12 May 2013
PIXAR. 25 Years of Animation

Adventurous toy figures, lively racing cars and a rat as chef – the exhibition PIXAR: 25 Years of Animation on show at the MKG provides insights into the fascinating process of making animated films. The exhibition shows how the heroes of movies like Toy Story, Find Nemo, Ratatouille, Cars and Merida are developed and filled with life. With a focus film as a medium, the show will shed light on the utilization of advertising technology and the further development of applied arts within the computer age. Even if computers play a key role in the making of animated movies, those films would be inconceivable without the artistic capabilities of individuals. PIXAR: 25 Years of Animation is devoted to the creative professionals – illustrators, graphic designers, animation artists and model sculpturors – who work behind the familiar cartoon characters and elucidates the importance of the applied arts within the animated film. With more than five hundred objects including sketches, graphics, colour drawings, pastel paintings, sculptures, media installations, touchscreens and short films, the exhibition retraces the highly complex production process of popular cinematic artworks, taking the Pixar animation studio as an example. It will give insight into the creative processes carried out by the filmmakers, as well as the radical revolution in international animated film production. The artistic process is carried to completion long before the work on the computer begins. The basic elements of each film are initially developed with the use of traditional artistic disciplines such as drawing, painting, and sculpture; they are literally handmade. The characters are not digitally processed on using the computer until a later stage. Pixar, today a subsidiary of the Walt Disney Company, started to develop with short films and promos in 1986. In 1995, the enterprise revolutionized the animated movie genre with Toy Story, the first entirely computeranimated film. Since then, Pixar has produced thirteen full-length films, which have drawn more than forty million moviegoers of all ages in Germany alone.

Abb.: Lou Romano, Colorscript, Die Unglaublichen, 2004, Digitalzeichnung, © Disney